Tag Archives: Games

Replay – Cities: Skylines

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There’s no serious way I can make Cities: Skylines sound sexy and I’ve tried at least six different drafts of this. It lacks the explosive action of popular games like PlayerUnknown’sBattlegroundsOverwatch, or anything that involves murdering people. Cities: Skylines is the complete antithesis of games like that: it’s slow, very mellow and about procedural growth. I’d forgive you if this is where you started tuning out but if you can, bear with me.

It probably explains a lot I smoke a decent amount of weed before zoning out for the next four hours in what is surely a bizarre stupor to any bystanders. There is no decipherable action to let you know you’re doing right aside from numbers being green, happy sounding noises, no angry looking icons floating above buildings, and the bright green smiley face at the bottom of the HUD telling me I’m doing a-ok. That’s not to say there aren’t frustrating moments. After all, nothing like spending an hour trying to revive a city imploded by my own lack of foresight.

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Skylines is without argument the best SimCity-esque game on the market today, beating out even the originator itself, SimCity. Of which was deeply shamed back in 2013 so badly EA had to do a LOT of damage control and probably won’t be heard from ever again. The goal is very simple: develop your provided property into a growing town and supervisor its development and growth into a full-blown city. However actually doing this is another, as unlike in SimCity 4 (the last decent SimCity), it’s pretty possible to fail making a town from the very start.

This is a supremely menu driven game, and many of your questions you’ll come across during your time building cities will often be answered looking for data within the myriad of menus, though perhaps not so obviously. Skylines asks the player to think ahead in terms of how to proceed, because while not impossible, it’s hard and damaging to your city to try and re-build segments after they’ve already started growing independently.

Your endgame is to create as large as city as possible, anyway you want so long as it is financially sustainable. This means watching your budget, finding ways to squeeze just a little more money from your properties without pissing off your constituents, and giving your city time to develop organically by letting its simulations run a bit. You’ll want to throw stadiums around and grow as fast as possible, however too fast growth can also mean your artificial population bubble will burst hard when the weight of the city collapses upon itself because you didn’t let its population catch-up to your rapid growth.

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Unlike the aforementioned SimCity, the world of Skylines feels organic and alive. Your citizens, each and every one, can be selected, followed and studied. They are born, they grow, they work, they die. They also unfortunately move into cities at the exact same age, causing what’s known in the Cities: Skylines community as a “death wave” if you grow a huge chunk of your city at the same time. Good luck keeping your cemeteries open.

Perhaps the biggest complaint against Cities: Skylines is the developer’s tendency to create weak DLC and charge premium prices. I don’t have any of the paid-DLC installed (there are bits of free DLC that are quite a bit of fun), but I can say I don’t feel like I’m missing anything. It’s also hard for me to justify spending $12.99 USD to include natural disasters, a feature I find myself asking why the fuck would I pay so much for. Seems like something basic that should’ve been included from the onset.

You could spend $5.99 USD to supplement the free Match Day DLC (which gives you the ability to place a large-scale football stadium in your city) with four actual recreations of real football stadiums such as FC Barcelona, Chelsea, PSG, and Juventus. Again, you might’ve missed where I said this $5.99 DLC just has four stadiums. This is the type of crap I was talking about.

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Look, again, none of this sounds sexy, like, at all. Cities: Skylines is meant for a particular audience: one tired of random violence and into methodical, zen-like construction. I enjoy the steady grind of slowly letting a city build its economy up itself. There is a sense of peace and focus I’ve never quite experienced with other games. Sure, it’s easy to zone out but the game also calls for a measure of attention to make sure your growing city doesn’t decay from within so easily. There is no end, just the infinite potential of growth and seeing what kind of civil creator you are. Or at least until you misappropriate the city’s funds.

 

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Injustice 2 keeps it moving with Fighter Pack 2: Black Manta, Raiden & Hellboy

While we’re still busying enjoying the new ranged fighter Starfire, Netherrealm dropped details on the upcoming fighter pack 2 which will include Black Manta, Raiden, and Hellboy. Netherrealm put together a sexy video of the new combatants for your pleasure.

Hellboy is probably the greatest surprise of the bunch, while Raiden and Black Manta long having been guessed to be part of the roster. Black Manta will be the first of the new pack to be released. The release date has yet to be dropped but you can see Black Manta’s promo video below. If you’ve been lagging, I’ve also included a vid of Starfire’s abilities below that.

TV Theatre – Castlevania

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Netflix has shown they’re willing to be a little out-there when it comes to their original programming. Castlevania, from the Konami franchise that’s basically been abandoned to being licensed pachinko machines, is the latest in that trend. It’s an animated mini-series telling the story of Dracula himself raining literal hell down on stupid mortals for crossing him. The show is written by Warren Ellis who has penned some of the best comic book arcs around. That fact alone should make you feel more at ease that this is going to be good.

The season is extremely short with only four episodes that are no more than 22-23 minutes a piece. The animation is a bit inconsistent, with some scenes looking better than others (some of the action scenes are unfortunately choppy). However the voice acting and music help tie everything into a rather pleasantly cool show. It also makes certain this is not a cartoon for kiddies, as it revels in being a mature program from the copious, detailed gore to the pretty straight-up adult dialogue.

And speaking about pleasant, this show is incredibly gory and filled with lots of surprising dark humor. Did I say it was gory? It’s the type of mixture that had me reminiscing on HBO’s Spawn, though without the nudity (at least so far). It plays off its source material really well, though let’s not kid ourselves that Castlevania was ever really that deep to begin with. The franchise is about monster slaying and season one lays the groundwork of that well enough.

Season one was at best an appetizer, as inaugural seasons tend to be. However in this case binge watching this show should be mandatory. For example, I’d argue the 80 some minutes you could spend watching Castlevania would be better served than watching something like, I don’t know, Transformers: The Last Knight which was, ha ha, fucking horrible.

It surprised me in certain ways (the dark humor was legit very funny) and disappointed in others (super short, ends way too soon). I feel like I watched a very long trailer for a pretty cool TV series. I guess the question now is when does this series really start? Netflix has already renewed Castlevania for a second season.

SNES Classic

Last November, Nintendo teased the shit out of North American fans announcing the (limited) release of the NES Classic, a hand-sized replica of the original 1985 North American release of the Nintendo Entertainment System. Pre-packaged with 30 games, it was the hottest holiday toy neither you nor most people could find south of $200 thanks to second-hand markets. Nintendo is saying forget all that, as this year we were psyched to hear their giving the face lift treatment to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, arguably packed even tighter with some of the greatest games released forget of the era, maybe even to date. Slated for a September 29 release, it’s guaranteed to go fast, if not faster, than the NES did. It’s also listed retailing at $79.99 USD.

While the roster of games isn’t as beefy as the 30 offered on the NES, the 21 games you’re getting here are more than solid:

North America / Europe

  • Super Mario World
  • Super Mario Kart
  • Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past
  • F-Zero
  • Super Metroid
  • Street Fighter II
  • Super Punch-Out!!
  • Castlevania IV
  • Donkey Kong Country
  • Mega Man X
  • Kirby Super Star
  • Final Fantasy III (FF6 JPN)
  • Kirby’s Dream Course
  • StarFox
  • StarFox 2 (previously unreleased)
  • Yoshi’s Island
  • Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars
  • Contra III: The Alien Wars
  • Secret of Mana
  • EarthBound
  • Super Ghouls-n-Ghosts

Japan

  • Contra III: Alien Wars
  • Donkey Kong Country
  • F-Zero
  • Final Fantasy VI
  • Fire Emblem: Mystery of the Emblem
  • Legend of the Mystical Ninja
  • Kirby Super Star
  • Mega Man X
  • Panel de Pon
  • Secret of Mana
  • Star Fox
  • Star Fox 2
  • Super Soccer
  • Super Ghouls-n-Ghosts
  • Super Mario Kart
  • Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars
  • Super Mario World
  • Super Mario World 2: Yoshi’s Island
  • Super Metroid
  • Super Street Fighter 2: The New Challengers
  • The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

Star Fox 2 is the treasure of the group, having never seen North American shores before. Reportedly you must first play Star Fox first to unlock Star Fox 2, but I don’t think Nintendo is pulling anyone’s leg here asking you to play a classic.

While the mini-console has an HDMI output, none of the games are being changes in any core way. They are essentially to play just as they would’ve on their original decks in the 90s. Pre-orders are right now being scoured for throughout the Internet, though at the time of writing, there are no takers quite yet. Supposedly pre-orders are beginning to happen in Germany, but North American fans just need to hang on just a little longer. Plus the European edition of the Super Nintendo is fashioned after the original European release, just as the Japanese is a remake of the Famicon design.

There’s absolutely no doubt scalpers are chomping at the bit to get these, though Nintendo wants to rest fans assured they’re going to produce more units than they did of the NES Classic, which disappeared as quickly as they touched shelves. Still, due diligence is probably necessary if you’re going to want to get your hands on one.